2017 OCYP Annual Report: A 5-year Reflection

Carrie Cooper

By Carrie Cooper
OCYP Director

As we publish this 5th edition of the work of the OCYP, I asked myself this question – have we made a difference in acknowledging and addressing the reality of child sexual abuse within our faith community? I believe the answer is yes. And I also believe there is so much more we can do.

Since 2012, I’ve had the great honor to meet with abuse survivors and their families and be trusted and accepted enough to hear their stories. I’ve met some of the most amazing heroes of our Church family, and my heart aches for them because of the harm done to them by an agent of our Church. Not just physical or emotional harm, but spiritual harm – because abuse perpetrated in the name of God inflicts deeps wounds to one’s soul. My prayer is that our Church will continue to listen — because every story matters — and to show more love and kindness to those who have been harmed directly by an agent of the Church, or harmed indirectly by those who looked the other way, by those who didn’t believe their story, or by those who protected the abuser over them.

For those who abuse or cross appropriate boundaries with children in our Church, you must be held accountable. Because safe churches are where abusers are reported and held responsible regardless of who they are. This is the kind of Church we strive to be. This is who God expects us to be.

Since 2002, when the Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People was adopted by the USCCB, our diocese has offered child sexual abuse awareness training to over 35,000 adults. As caring adults, it is our responsibility to protect children and the vulnerable. We are the first line of defense against sexual abuse.

Training children to protect themselves and to learn how to report suspicious behavior is a key element in our Church’s awareness and prevention efforts. Nearly 13,000 children and youth received this important training last year. Each year we continue to empower adults and children by arming them with knowledge and awareness in order to make this diocese a safe place for all. Each year, these efforts continue to strengthen our safety net of protection.

Recently, Pope Francis acknowledged the Church’s “own failures in providing for the protection of children: extremely grave facts have come to light, for which we have to accept our responsibility before God, before the victims and before public opinion.” The Pope added “as a result of these painful experiences and the skills gained in the process of conversion and purification, the Church today feels especially bound to work strenuously and with foresight for the protection of minors and their dignity, not only within her own ranks, but in society as a whole and throughout the world.”

I’ve joined the Pope in this vision. Won’t you join with me in promotion of healing and protection?

 

 

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  • J. Toole

    CHILD ABUSE ISN’T THE ONLY SIN BEING COMMITTED. PLEASE START ACKNOWLEDGING THE TRUTH ABOUT THE HOMOSEXUAL NETWORK THAT HAS RAVISHED OUR GREAT CHURCH. THIS IS WHY PRIESTS ARE NO LONGER PREACHING ABOUT SIN AND THE PEWS ARE EMPTY.

    COULD THE DIOCESE OF K C BE GAY-INFESTED? ARE MEN OF THE CLOTH USING THEIR POWER TO SOLICIT AND ENGAGE IN PREDATORY HOMOSEXUAL AGGRESSION UPON ADULT MALES? ARE THEY INVOLVED WITH THE LARGE AND WELL ESTABLISHED GAY CLERGY NETWORK, BRINGING LATIN AMERICAN HOMOSEXUALS TO AMERICA? READ THESE FACTS ABOUT THE SALAZAR CASE!
    Fr Salazar was rejected by his superiors in Guatemala after years in a minor seminary and told to spend a year in prayer and discernment. What did they know that convinced them that he wasn’t fit for ordination?
    According to a glowing article in The Key celebrating Salazar’s struggles culminating in ordination and deployment in the Kansas City diocese, he met a priest in his country, whose name he couldn’t recall, Salazar states: “I do not remember his name, but right away, he put me in contact with Father Richard Rocha (diocesan vocations director) and Gustavo Valdez (now diocesan director of Hispanic Ministry) who helped me get through the process,” “He was the angel and the sign I asked God for in those days of despair,” he said. “We were eating breakfast and suddenly we started talking about the Diocese of Kansas City-St. Joseph and the need for Spanish-speaking seminarians.
    “He looked at me and without knowing who I was, said, ‘Do you want to come?’”
    “My answer was, ‘I could not survive in your country. I do not speak the language,’” Father Salazar said.
    “He said, ‘Come on. Don’t you trust in God?’”
    ISN’T IT TIME FOR FAITHFUL CATHOLICS TO WAKE UP AND DEMAND TO KNOW THE TRUTH!!
    1. FR Salazar couldn’t get ordained in his country
    2. He just happens to meet someone in his home country that changes the course of his life whose name he doesn’t remember.
    3. He can’t speak a word of English.
    4. Referring to his good fortune at the hands of his Kansas City clerical handlers for giving him the express, no-questions-asked approval and full acceptance, he says: while having breakfast “he looked at me NOT KNOWING WHO I WAS”.
    5. Salazar even questioned his own ability to “Survive” in this country during the breakfast encounter, yet he was pushed. I’d say emotionally manipulated when admonished “come on, Don’t you trust in God”.
    5.Then, apparently according to what now is being revealed as the Gay lobby’s formula, he’s shipped off to the notorious Connecticut Seminary which made headlines just this week.
    NEWS FLASH!! {In an official statement released Tuesday, Holy Apostles president and rector Fr. Douglas Mosey, C.S.B. braced supporters for potential fallout from the apostolate’s Aug. 21 exposé showing that for years, former Hartford Abp. Henry Mansell and other U.S. prelates secretly imported gay seminarians from Latin America into the United States}.

    The Bishop needs to provide full disclosure and an explanation as to why he sanctioned Salazar in the first place, let alone receiving Salazar’s “First Blessing”, as shown in the Key article. The faithful should demand answers on what connection has existed between the K C diocese and Latin America in importing homosexual seminarians. Based on the Key article and Salazar’s own statements, it appears more like a case of human trafficking! He was pushed into the priesthood and he may well be as much a victim as his those accusing him.

Wednesday
October 17, 2018
Newspaper of the Diocese of Kansas City ~ St. Joseph